{"id":10245563585,"title":"Tenugui - Hand Towel - Ukiyo-e Image Man (T27)","handle":"tenugui-hand-towel-ukiyo-e-image-man-t27","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis hand towel is called a \"tenugui\". A Tenugui (手拭い) is a thin Japanese hand towel made of cotton. It is typically  plain woven and is almost always dyed with some pattern. It can be used for anything a towel could be used for - as a washcloth, dishcloth, but often as a headband, souvenir or decoration. Towels made from terry cloth have replaced many of its use in the household. However tenugui are still popular as souvenirs, decorations, and as a head covering in kendo, where it functions as a sweatband, as extra padding beneath the headgear (men), and to identify the participants by team color.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt is 35 cm x 87 cm (approx 35 x 13 inches) and is 100% cotton.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eTōshūsai Sharaku\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (active 1794–1795) was a Japanese ukiyo-e print artist, known for his portraits of kabuki actors and sumo wrestlers. Little is known of him besides the prints he designed; neither his true name nor the dates of his birth or death are known. His active career as a woodblock artist spanned ten months; his prolific work met disapproval, and his output came to an end as suddenly and mysteriously as it had begun. His work has since been recognized as some of the greatest in the ukiyo-e genre.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePrimarily portraits of kabuki actors, Sharaku's compositions emphasize poses of dynamism and energy, and display a realism unusual for prints of the time—Sharaku did not shy from showing unflattering details. This was not to the tastes of the public, and the enigmatic artist's production ceased in the first month of 1795. His mastery of the medium with no apparent apprenticeship has drawn much speculation, and researchers have long attempted to discover his true identity.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cspan style=\"font-family: Georgia;\" face=\"Georgia\"\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-size: x-large;\" size=\"5\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e","published_at":"2017-06-11T16:33:00+09:00","created_at":"2017-10-02T23:27:47+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Tenugui","tags":["Pattern_Ukiyo-e"],"price":650,"price_min":650,"price_max":650,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":38276146625,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Tenugui - Hand Towel - Ukiyo-e Image Man (T27)","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":650,"weight":35,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":4,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/x_54e8a606-fda4-4786-a608-c9b819601cc9.jpg?v=1506954928","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/xx_0b4336f8-337a-465d-a591-1e6a8e3cb173.jpg?v=1506954935","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/xxx_a3fcfc08-6c23-4f91-84b8-4d5e3430f4ce.jpg?v=1506954942","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/xxxx_1a5eec6f-87ea-4031-b4be-60530ed5cd6f.jpg?v=1506954948"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/x_54e8a606-fda4-4786-a608-c9b819601cc9.jpg?v=1506954928","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis hand towel is called a \"tenugui\". A Tenugui (手拭い) is a thin Japanese hand towel made of cotton. It is typically  plain woven and is almost always dyed with some pattern. It can be used for anything a towel could be used for - as a washcloth, dishcloth, but often as a headband, souvenir or decoration. Towels made from terry cloth have replaced many of its use in the household. However tenugui are still popular as souvenirs, decorations, and as a head covering in kendo, where it functions as a sweatband, as extra padding beneath the headgear (men), and to identify the participants by team color.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt is 35 cm x 87 cm (approx 35 x 13 inches) and is 100% cotton.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eTōshūsai Sharaku\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (active 1794–1795) was a Japanese ukiyo-e print artist, known for his portraits of kabuki actors and sumo wrestlers. Little is known of him besides the prints he designed; neither his true name nor the dates of his birth or death are known. His active career as a woodblock artist spanned ten months; his prolific work met disapproval, and his output came to an end as suddenly and mysteriously as it had begun. His work has since been recognized as some of the greatest in the ukiyo-e genre.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePrimarily portraits of kabuki actors, Sharaku's compositions emphasize poses of dynamism and energy, and display a realism unusual for prints of the time—Sharaku did not shy from showing unflattering details. This was not to the tastes of the public, and the enigmatic artist's production ceased in the first month of 1795. His mastery of the medium with no apparent apprenticeship has drawn much speculation, and researchers have long attempted to discover his true identity.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cspan style=\"font-family: Georgia;\" face=\"Georgia\"\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-size: x-large;\" size=\"5\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e"}

Tenugui - Hand Towel - Ukiyo-e Image Man (T27)

Product Description

This hand towel is called a "tenugui". A Tenugui (手拭い) is a thin Japanese hand towel made of cotton. It is typically  plain woven and is almost always dyed with some pattern. It can be used for anything a towel could be used for - as a washcloth, dishcloth, but often as a headband, souvenir or decoration. Towels made from terry cloth have replaced many of its use in the household. However tenugui are still popular as souvenirs, decorations, and as a head covering in kendo, where it functions as a sweatband, as extra padding beneath the headgear (men), and to identify the participants by team color.

It is 35 cm x 87 cm (approx 35 x 13 inches) and is 100% cotton.

Tōshūsai Sharaku (active 1794–1795) was a Japanese ukiyo-e print artist, known for his portraits of kabuki actors and sumo wrestlers. Little is known of him besides the prints he designed; neither his true name nor the dates of his birth or death are known. His active career as a woodblock artist spanned ten months; his prolific work met disapproval, and his output came to an end as suddenly and mysteriously as it had begun. His work has since been recognized as some of the greatest in the ukiyo-e genre.

Primarily portraits of kabuki actors, Sharaku's compositions emphasize poses of dynamism and energy, and display a realism unusual for prints of the time—Sharaku did not shy from showing unflattering details. This was not to the tastes of the public, and the enigmatic artist's production ceased in the first month of 1795. His mastery of the medium with no apparent apprenticeship has drawn much speculation, and researchers have long attempted to discover his true identity.

$6.50
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