{"id":9687249985,"title":"Japanese Shrine Plaque - Akiba Shrine Tokyo - Getting Rid Of Bad Luck - 1986 - Akihabara Train Station (1)","handle":"japanese-shrine-plaque-akiba-shrine-tokyo-getting-rid-of-bad-luck-1986-akihabara-train-station-1","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e******** This EMA is from Akiba Shrine in Akihabara, Tokyo. \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eAlmost everyone in Japan knows Akihabara, but not many people may know how it came to get that name, let alone that it was all the result of a misunderstanding. The story goes that there was once a shrine called Akiba Shrine near Ueno station. This shrine burned down in 1869 in a great fire in Tokyo, and by decree of the Meiji Emperor, a new shrine was built near what is now Akihabara station called “Chinka shrine” (“Chinka” meaning “put out fire”). Enshrined here were three gods that were also worshipped by the imperial family, gods of fire, earth, and water. However, the local people thought that the shrine was built for the worship of a more well-known god of fire prevention, called Akiba-Daigongen, whom they called “Akiba-sama”. The area around this temple then became known as “Akihabara” (“Akiba’s field”).\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Kanji above the picture of the building says \"akiba shrine\" and \"getting rid of bad luck\".\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt is from January 1st in the 61st year of the Showa Era (=1986)\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt measures 13.5cm x 10.5 cm x 1mm.\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-06-12T01:42:37+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Trains"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":35584164417,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Japanese Shrine Plaque - Akiba Shrine Tokyo - Getting Rid Of Bad Luck - 1986 - Akihabara Train Station (1)","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":80,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/il_fullxfull.1033359341_toai_2d64331a-6e3a-4ef2-b842-88d4906ec1c4.jpg?v=1497200102","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/il_fullxfull.1033359341_toai.jpg?v=1497200102","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/il_fullxfull.986825892_6yow.jpg?v=1497200102","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/il_fullxfull.1033359373_rhns.jpg?v=1497200102","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/il_fullxfull.1033359387_7wd5.jpg?v=1497200102","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/il_fullxfull.1033359399_92jr.jpg?v=1497200102"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/il_fullxfull.1033359341_toai_2d64331a-6e3a-4ef2-b842-88d4906ec1c4.jpg?v=1497200102","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e******** This EMA is from Akiba Shrine in Akihabara, Tokyo. \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eAlmost everyone in Japan knows Akihabara, but not many people may know how it came to get that name, let alone that it was all the result of a misunderstanding. The story goes that there was once a shrine called Akiba Shrine near Ueno station. This shrine burned down in 1869 in a great fire in Tokyo, and by decree of the Meiji Emperor, a new shrine was built near what is now Akihabara station called “Chinka shrine” (“Chinka” meaning “put out fire”). Enshrined here were three gods that were also worshipped by the imperial family, gods of fire, earth, and water. However, the local people thought that the shrine was built for the worship of a more well-known god of fire prevention, called Akiba-Daigongen, whom they called “Akiba-sama”. The area around this temple then became known as “Akihabara” (“Akiba’s field”).\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Kanji above the picture of the building says \"akiba shrine\" and \"getting rid of bad luck\".\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt is from January 1st in the 61st year of the Showa Era (=1986)\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt measures 13.5cm x 10.5 cm x 1mm.\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Japanese Shrine Plaque - Akiba Shrine Tokyo - Getting Rid Of Bad Luck - 1986 - Akihabara Train Station (1)

Product Description

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.

Ema are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.

******** This EMA is from Akiba Shrine in Akihabara, Tokyo.

Almost everyone in Japan knows Akihabara, but not many people may know how it came to get that name, let alone that it was all the result of a misunderstanding. The story goes that there was once a shrine called Akiba Shrine near Ueno station. This shrine burned down in 1869 in a great fire in Tokyo, and by decree of the Meiji Emperor, a new shrine was built near what is now Akihabara station called “Chinka shrine” (“Chinka” meaning “put out fire”). Enshrined here were three gods that were also worshipped by the imperial family, gods of fire, earth, and water. However, the local people thought that the shrine was built for the worship of a more well-known god of fire prevention, called Akiba-Daigongen, whom they called “Akiba-sama”. The area around this temple then became known as “Akihabara” (“Akiba’s field”).

The Kanji above the picture of the building says "akiba shrine" and "getting rid of bad luck".

It is from January 1st in the 61st year of the Showa Era (=1986)


It measures 13.5cm x 10.5 cm x 1mm.

$15.00
Maximum quantity available reached.