{"id":10013542657,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque - Takeda Shrine Yamanashi (E9-16)","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-taikodani-inari-shrine-shimane-e9-16","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Takeda Shrine, Yamanashi Prefecture.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eFollowing the defeat of the Takeda clan during the Sengoku period, the Tsutsujigasaki fortified residence of Takeda Shingen was allowed to fall into ruins, and the center of Kōfu shifted south to surround Kōfu Castle, the center of administrative power under the Tokugawa shogunate. After the Meiji Restoration, the Tsutsujigasaki ruins came under government protection for their historic value and were eventually made a National Historic Monument of Japan. Following the visit of Emperor Meiji to Yamanashi Prefecture in 1880, a local movement developed for a shrine to honor the loyalists who had served in the Boshin War. This dovetailed with the State Shintō projects to erect shrines dedicated to historic figures noted for their martial prowess and with the need for a shrine to honor the war dead of the Russo-Japanese War. In 1915, Emperor Taishō commissioned the shrine, which was completed in 1919. 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The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Takeda Shrine, Yamanashi Prefecture.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eFollowing the defeat of the Takeda clan during the Sengoku period, the Tsutsujigasaki fortified residence of Takeda Shingen was allowed to fall into ruins, and the center of Kōfu shifted south to surround Kōfu Castle, the center of administrative power under the Tokugawa shogunate. After the Meiji Restoration, the Tsutsujigasaki ruins came under government protection for their historic value and were eventually made a National Historic Monument of Japan. Following the visit of Emperor Meiji to Yamanashi Prefecture in 1880, a local movement developed for a shrine to honor the loyalists who had served in the Boshin War. This dovetailed with the State Shintō projects to erect shrines dedicated to historic figures noted for their martial prowess and with the need for a shrine to honor the war dead of the Russo-Japanese War. In 1915, Emperor Taishō commissioned the shrine, which was completed in 1919. The shrine was ranked as a Prefectural Shrine under the Modern system of ranked Shinto Shrines before World War II.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is from  the 16th year of the Heisei era (2004)\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 20.5cm x 13cm x 1cm. \u003c\/p\u003e"}

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque - Takeda Shrine Yamanashi (E9-16)

Product Description

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.

Ema are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.

 

********This Ema is from Takeda Shrine, Yamanashi Prefecture.

Following the defeat of the Takeda clan during the Sengoku period, the Tsutsujigasaki fortified residence of Takeda Shingen was allowed to fall into ruins, and the center of Kōfu shifted south to surround Kōfu Castle, the center of administrative power under the Tokugawa shogunate. After the Meiji Restoration, the Tsutsujigasaki ruins came under government protection for their historic value and were eventually made a National Historic Monument of Japan. Following the visit of Emperor Meiji to Yamanashi Prefecture in 1880, a local movement developed for a shrine to honor the loyalists who had served in the Boshin War. This dovetailed with the State Shintō projects to erect shrines dedicated to historic figures noted for their martial prowess and with the need for a shrine to honor the war dead of the Russo-Japanese War. In 1915, Emperor Taishō commissioned the shrine, which was completed in 1919. The shrine was ranked as a Prefectural Shrine under the Modern system of ranked Shinto Shrines before World War II.

This Ema is from  the 16th year of the Heisei era (2004)
It measures about 20.5cm x 13cm x 1cm. 

$15.00
Maximum quantity available reached.