{"id":10010716033,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Himure Hachiman-gu (E9-12)","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-himure-hachiman-gu-e9-12","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Himure Hachiman-gu Shrine in Shiga, Japan. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eUntil the mid 19th century, the town of Omihachiman was divided by Hachiman-bori, north of which was a residential area for the warriors and south was for the townsfolk. The area for the townsfolk was further divided into the merchants' and craftsmen's areas. The current Shin-machi-dori Street marks the former merchants' area; preserved there, and open to the public, is the former residence of a wealthy merchant family, the Nishikawas. Local Artifacts Museum was built in the grounds of the former residence of an Omi merchant who traveled abroad, Nishimura Taroemon. Next to it is the History and Folklore Museum that shows us the lives of the merchants. Along the Hachiman-bori are white-walled storehouses and old houses like Haku-un-kan, a building where western architecture and Japanese tradition are well-matched; also here is the Kawara Museum (tile museum) that displays tiles from all parts of Japan.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOn the back, it talks about Mr  Taro Nishimura who was the pioneer to import and export by boat.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is from  the 12th year of the Heisei  Era (2000).\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 18.4cm x 11cm x 7mm. \u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-08-11T23:11:25+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Boat"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":37108198977,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Himure Hachiman-gu (E9-12)","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":80,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/aa_bec54d8e-9f0c-42fe-9211-a2f042635661.jpg?v=1502464126","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/a_713cb1dd-685a-4617-beab-272ae41b68b6.jpg?v=1502464135","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/aaa_2ede211c-8fc9-46bb-9273-e2ef3c3ceee0.jpg?v=1502464142","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/aaaa_55a5a78d-7b22-46b1-bc79-fa2c3fba5833.jpg?v=1502464149","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/aaaaa_19172ba3-2380-4788-a171-0f344794e8de.jpg?v=1502464174","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/aaaaaa_1d9286cb-774c-4d75-9694-747aaecadd32.jpg?v=1502464180"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/aa_bec54d8e-9f0c-42fe-9211-a2f042635661.jpg?v=1502464126","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Himure Hachiman-gu Shrine in Shiga, Japan. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eUntil the mid 19th century, the town of Omihachiman was divided by Hachiman-bori, north of which was a residential area for the warriors and south was for the townsfolk. The area for the townsfolk was further divided into the merchants' and craftsmen's areas. The current Shin-machi-dori Street marks the former merchants' area; preserved there, and open to the public, is the former residence of a wealthy merchant family, the Nishikawas. Local Artifacts Museum was built in the grounds of the former residence of an Omi merchant who traveled abroad, Nishimura Taroemon. Next to it is the History and Folklore Museum that shows us the lives of the merchants. Along the Hachiman-bori are white-walled storehouses and old houses like Haku-un-kan, a building where western architecture and Japanese tradition are well-matched; also here is the Kawara Museum (tile museum) that displays tiles from all parts of Japan.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOn the back, it talks about Mr  Taro Nishimura who was the pioneer to import and export by boat.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is from  the 12th year of the Heisei  Era (2000).\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 18.4cm x 11cm x 7mm. \u003c\/p\u003e"}

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Himure Hachiman-gu (E9-12)

Product Description

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.

Ema are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.


********This Ema is from Himure Hachiman-gu Shrine in Shiga, Japan. 

Until the mid 19th century, the town of Omihachiman was divided by Hachiman-bori, north of which was a residential area for the warriors and south was for the townsfolk. The area for the townsfolk was further divided into the merchants' and craftsmen's areas. The current Shin-machi-dori Street marks the former merchants' area; preserved there, and open to the public, is the former residence of a wealthy merchant family, the Nishikawas. Local Artifacts Museum was built in the grounds of the former residence of an Omi merchant who traveled abroad, Nishimura Taroemon. Next to it is the History and Folklore Museum that shows us the lives of the merchants. Along the Hachiman-bori are white-walled storehouses and old houses like Haku-un-kan, a building where western architecture and Japanese tradition are well-matched; also here is the Kawara Museum (tile museum) that displays tiles from all parts of Japan.

On the back, it talks about Mr  Taro Nishimura who was the pioneer to import and export by boat.


This Ema is from  the 12th year of the Heisei  Era (2000).

It measures about 18.4cm x 11cm x 7mm. 

$15.00
Maximum quantity available reached.