{"id":19943915521,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Byodo-In (E9-27) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-byodo-in-e9-27-buddhist-temple-in-kyoto","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Byodo-In Temple, Kyoto Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eByōdō-in\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (平等院) is a Buddhist temple in the city of Uji in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan, built in late Heian period. It is jointly a temple of the Jōdo-shū (Pure Land) and Tendai-shū sects.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis temple was originally built in 998 in the Heian period as a rural villa of high-ranking courtier Minamoto no Shigenobu, Minister of the Left. The property was purchased from Minamoto no Shigenobu's wife after he died by Fujiwara no Michinaga, one of the most powerful members of the Fujiwara clan. The villa was made into a Buddhist temple by Fujiwara no Yorimichi in 1052. The most famous building in the temple is the Phoenix Hall (鳳凰堂 \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eHōō-dō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e) or the Amida Hall, constructed in 1053. It is the only remaining original building, surrounded by a scenic pond; additional buildings making up the compound were burnt down during a civil war in 1336.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe main building in Byōdō-in, the Phoenix Hall consists of a central hall, flanked by twin wing corridors on both sides of the central hall, and a tail corridor. The central hall houses an image of Amida Buddha. The roof of the hall displays statues of the Chinese phoenix, called \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003ehōō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e in Japanese.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Phoenix Hall, completed in 1053, is the exemplar of Fujiwara Amida halls. It consists of a main rectangular structure flanked by two L-shaped wing corridors and a tail corridor, set at the edge of a large artificial pond. Though its official name is Amida-dō, it began to be called Hōō-dō, or Phoenix Hall, in the beginning of the Edo period. This name is considered to derive both from the building's likeness to a phoenix with outstretched wings and a tail, and the pair of phoenixes adorning the roof.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eInside the Phoenix Hall, a single image of Amida (c. 1053) is installed on a high platform. The Amida sculpture is made of Japanese cypress and is covered with gold leaf. It was executed by Jōchō, who used a new canon of proportions and a new technique, \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eyosegi\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e, in which multiple pieces of wood are carved out like shells and joined from the inside. The statue measures about three meters high from its face to its knees, and is seated. Applied to the walls of the hall are small relief carvings of celestials, the host believed to have accompanied Amida when he descended from the Western Paradise to gather the souls of believers at the moment of death and transport them in lotus blossoms to Paradise. \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eRaigō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e paintings on the wooden doors of the Phoenix Hall, depicting the Descent of the Amida Buddha, are an early example of Yamato-e, Japanese-style painting, and contain representations of the scenery around Kyoto.\u003c\/p\u003e\nIt measures about 5.5cm x 6.2cm x 1cm.","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-10-29T17:16:15+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Phoenix"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":83889782785,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Byodo-In (E9-27) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":80,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_2802.JPG?v=1509266197","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_2803.JPG?v=1509266205","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_2804.JPG?v=1509266214","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_2805.JPG?v=1509266222","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_2806.JPG?v=1509266229"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_2802.JPG?v=1509266197","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Byodo-In Temple, Kyoto Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eByōdō-in\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (平等院) is a Buddhist temple in the city of Uji in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan, built in late Heian period. It is jointly a temple of the Jōdo-shū (Pure Land) and Tendai-shū sects.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis temple was originally built in 998 in the Heian period as a rural villa of high-ranking courtier Minamoto no Shigenobu, Minister of the Left. The property was purchased from Minamoto no Shigenobu's wife after he died by Fujiwara no Michinaga, one of the most powerful members of the Fujiwara clan. The villa was made into a Buddhist temple by Fujiwara no Yorimichi in 1052. The most famous building in the temple is the Phoenix Hall (鳳凰堂 \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eHōō-dō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e) or the Amida Hall, constructed in 1053. It is the only remaining original building, surrounded by a scenic pond; additional buildings making up the compound were burnt down during a civil war in 1336.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe main building in Byōdō-in, the Phoenix Hall consists of a central hall, flanked by twin wing corridors on both sides of the central hall, and a tail corridor. The central hall houses an image of Amida Buddha. The roof of the hall displays statues of the Chinese phoenix, called \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003ehōō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e in Japanese.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Phoenix Hall, completed in 1053, is the exemplar of Fujiwara Amida halls. It consists of a main rectangular structure flanked by two L-shaped wing corridors and a tail corridor, set at the edge of a large artificial pond. Though its official name is Amida-dō, it began to be called Hōō-dō, or Phoenix Hall, in the beginning of the Edo period. This name is considered to derive both from the building's likeness to a phoenix with outstretched wings and a tail, and the pair of phoenixes adorning the roof.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eInside the Phoenix Hall, a single image of Amida (c. 1053) is installed on a high platform. The Amida sculpture is made of Japanese cypress and is covered with gold leaf. It was executed by Jōchō, who used a new canon of proportions and a new technique, \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eyosegi\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e, in which multiple pieces of wood are carved out like shells and joined from the inside. The statue measures about three meters high from its face to its knees, and is seated. Applied to the walls of the hall are small relief carvings of celestials, the host believed to have accompanied Amida when he descended from the Western Paradise to gather the souls of believers at the moment of death and transport them in lotus blossoms to Paradise. \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eRaigō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e paintings on the wooden doors of the Phoenix Hall, depicting the Descent of the Amida Buddha, are an early example of Yamato-e, Japanese-style painting, and contain representations of the scenery around Kyoto.\u003c\/p\u003e\nIt measures about 5.5cm x 6.2cm x 1cm."}

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Byodo-In (E9-27) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto

Product Description

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.

Ema are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.


********This Ema is from Byodo-In Temple, Kyoto Prefecture.

Byōdō-in (平等院) is a Buddhist temple in the city of Uji in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan, built in late Heian period. It is jointly a temple of the Jōdo-shū (Pure Land) and Tendai-shū sects.

This temple was originally built in 998 in the Heian period as a rural villa of high-ranking courtier Minamoto no Shigenobu, Minister of the Left. The property was purchased from Minamoto no Shigenobu's wife after he died by Fujiwara no Michinaga, one of the most powerful members of the Fujiwara clan. The villa was made into a Buddhist temple by Fujiwara no Yorimichi in 1052. The most famous building in the temple is the Phoenix Hall (鳳凰堂 Hōō-dō) or the Amida Hall, constructed in 1053. It is the only remaining original building, surrounded by a scenic pond; additional buildings making up the compound were burnt down during a civil war in 1336.

The main building in Byōdō-in, the Phoenix Hall consists of a central hall, flanked by twin wing corridors on both sides of the central hall, and a tail corridor. The central hall houses an image of Amida Buddha. The roof of the hall displays statues of the Chinese phoenix, called hōō in Japanese.

The Phoenix Hall, completed in 1053, is the exemplar of Fujiwara Amida halls. It consists of a main rectangular structure flanked by two L-shaped wing corridors and a tail corridor, set at the edge of a large artificial pond. Though its official name is Amida-dō, it began to be called Hōō-dō, or Phoenix Hall, in the beginning of the Edo period. This name is considered to derive both from the building's likeness to a phoenix with outstretched wings and a tail, and the pair of phoenixes adorning the roof.

Inside the Phoenix Hall, a single image of Amida (c. 1053) is installed on a high platform. The Amida sculpture is made of Japanese cypress and is covered with gold leaf. It was executed by Jōchō, who used a new canon of proportions and a new technique, yosegi, in which multiple pieces of wood are carved out like shells and joined from the inside. The statue measures about three meters high from its face to its knees, and is seated. Applied to the walls of the hall are small relief carvings of celestials, the host believed to have accompanied Amida when he descended from the Western Paradise to gather the souls of believers at the moment of death and transport them in lotus blossoms to Paradise. Raigō paintings on the wooden doors of the Phoenix Hall, depicting the Descent of the Amida Buddha, are an early example of Yamato-e, Japanese-style painting, and contain representations of the scenery around Kyoto.

It measures about 5.5cm x 6.2cm x 1cm.
$15.00
Maximum quantity available reached.