Shrine Plaques
"Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes.

Shrine Plaques

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{"id":34852241409,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Kirishima Jingu Shrine Tengu Kagoshima (E9-26)","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-kirishima-jingu-shrine-kagoshima-e9-26","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Kirishima Jingu Kagoshima Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eKirishima-Jingū\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (霧島神宮), also called Takachiho-no-mine-jina (one of the peak of Mount Kirishima and the place of Tenson kōrin) is a Shinto shrine located in Kirishima, Kagoshima prefecture, Japan.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe mountains of Kirishima are an important site in the creation mythology of Japan. It was in this area that the god Ninigi no Mikoto, grandson of the sun goddess Amaterasu, is said to have descended from heaven to rule over the earth.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eNinigi no Mikoto landed on nearby Mt. Takachiho-no-mine bringing with him the three imperial regalia: the sword, the mirror and the gem; symbols of the imperial family. He eventually married a local princess, becoming mortal in the process, and established the lineage of Japanese Emperors.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eDevoted to Ninigi no Mikoto, Kirishima Shrine was built during the Muromachi Period on a different site from where it stands today. Since then it has been destroyed numerous times by volcanic eruptions, but always rebuilt. The current shrine was constructed in 1715 where it survives to this day. Its large, beautiful buildings are surrounded by forest and have been declared important cultural property.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe image on the plaque is called a \"tengu\".\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003ci\u003eTengu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (天狗, \"heavenly dog\") are a type of legendary creature found in Japanese folk religion and are also considered a type of Shinto god (kami) or yōkai (supernatural beings). Although they take their name from a dog-like Chinese demon (Tiangou), the \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003etengu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e were originally thought to take the forms of birds of prey, and they are traditionally depicted with both human and avian characteristics. The earliest \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003etengu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e were pictured with beaks, but this feature has often been humanized as an unnaturally long nose, which today is widely considered the \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003etengu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e's defining characteristic in the popular imagination.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eBuddhism long held that the \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003etengu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e were disruptive demons and harbingers of war. Their image gradually softened, however, into one of protective, if still dangerous, spirits of the mountains and forests. \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eTengu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e are associated with the ascetic practice of Shugendō, and they are usually depicted in the garb of its followers, the \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eyamabushi\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n \u003cbr\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is from  the 21st year of the Heisei era (2009)\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 15.5cm x 12cm x 7mm. \u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-11-05T18:29:55+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Amulet"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":134501236737,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Kirishima Jingu Shrine Tengu Kagoshima (E9-26)","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":80,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8303_043cca15-5e31-4525-8b70-6ff518a89d62.JPG?v=1509875464","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8303.JPG?v=1509875473","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8304.JPG?v=1509875481","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8305.JPG?v=1509875489","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8306.JPG?v=1509875500","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8307.JPG?v=1509875510"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8303_043cca15-5e31-4525-8b70-6ff518a89d62.JPG?v=1509875464","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Kirishima Jingu Kagoshima Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eKirishima-Jingū\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (霧島神宮), also called Takachiho-no-mine-jina (one of the peak of Mount Kirishima and the place of Tenson kōrin) is a Shinto shrine located in Kirishima, Kagoshima prefecture, Japan.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe mountains of Kirishima are an important site in the creation mythology of Japan. It was in this area that the god Ninigi no Mikoto, grandson of the sun goddess Amaterasu, is said to have descended from heaven to rule over the earth.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eNinigi no Mikoto landed on nearby Mt. Takachiho-no-mine bringing with him the three imperial regalia: the sword, the mirror and the gem; symbols of the imperial family. He eventually married a local princess, becoming mortal in the process, and established the lineage of Japanese Emperors.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eDevoted to Ninigi no Mikoto, Kirishima Shrine was built during the Muromachi Period on a different site from where it stands today. Since then it has been destroyed numerous times by volcanic eruptions, but always rebuilt. The current shrine was constructed in 1715 where it survives to this day. Its large, beautiful buildings are surrounded by forest and have been declared important cultural property.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe image on the plaque is called a \"tengu\".\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003ci\u003eTengu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (天狗, \"heavenly dog\") are a type of legendary creature found in Japanese folk religion and are also considered a type of Shinto god (kami) or yōkai (supernatural beings). Although they take their name from a dog-like Chinese demon (Tiangou), the \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003etengu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e were originally thought to take the forms of birds of prey, and they are traditionally depicted with both human and avian characteristics. The earliest \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003etengu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e were pictured with beaks, but this feature has often been humanized as an unnaturally long nose, which today is widely considered the \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003etengu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e's defining characteristic in the popular imagination.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eBuddhism long held that the \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003etengu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e were disruptive demons and harbingers of war. Their image gradually softened, however, into one of protective, if still dangerous, spirits of the mountains and forests. \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eTengu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e are associated with the ascetic practice of Shugendō, and they are usually depicted in the garb of its followers, the \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eyamabushi\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n \u003cbr\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is from  the 21st year of the Heisei era (2009)\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 15.5cm x 12cm x 7mm. \u003c\/p\u003e"}
Japanese Shrine Plaque - Ema - Kagoshima Tengu

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Kirishima Jingu Shrine Tengu Kagoshima (E9-26)

$15.00

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side....


More Info
{"id":20031897601,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Yukura Shrine (E9-20) Hokkaido","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-hakodate-hachimangu-e9-20","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Yukura Shrine from Hokkaido Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\"Legend says over 500 years ago around 1453, a wood cutter found a steaming marshland when he was resting on a low hill on his way home. Drawing close he put his hand into the water to find it was a hot spring. Later when the wood cutter felt pain in his arm joint, recalling of the spring, he bathed in it to find his arm cured shortly after. In gratitude the wood cutter carved a Yakushinyorai (Bhaisajyaguru) and built a small shrine to enshrine it in. This is how the Yukura Shrine was born and Yunokawa Onsen began.\u003cbr\u003e Above is lore, but from the research done by Matsumae clan in 1717 it is stated that the shrine was approximately 100 years old. The “Yakushinyorai” is supposed to have been enshrined at the springs since 1617. And from certain fact and existing shrine treasures show clear pedigree. When Takahiro, the 9th lord of Matsumae clan, was young and called Chikatsu-maru, he became seriously ill. Doctors and medication and failed to help and his conditions were worse every day. One night his mother Seiryoin saw prophecy in her dream “Seek east of Matsumae, You shall find a mysterious hot spring. There all illness will be cured.” Immediately she sent a servant to find the hot spring and bathed Chikatsu-maru in it. Shortly Chikatsu-maru recovered completely. The coming year 1654, Seiryoin reconstructed the shrine pavilion and enshrined a Yakushinyorai about 16cm long made from Shiriuchi gold dust and a Wanikuchi about 19cm wide. Ever since, the shrine has been worshiped to the locals as their heart and soul. In 1876 it was ranked as a township shrine. In 1941 the current pavilions were built.\u003cbr\u003e Devine virtues rise high along with the city’s development up to this day. \"\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis is from the 20th year of the Heisei Era (2008)\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIt measures about 15 x 9.6 x 5mm.\u003c\/p\u003e\nIt measures about 17.7cm x 10.8cm x 8mm. It is from 2004.","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-10-29T18:48:08+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Horse"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":84888190977,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Yukura Shrine (E9-20) Hokkaido","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":80,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8270.JPG?v=1509271765","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8271.JPG?v=1509271772","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8272.JPG?v=1509271780","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8273.JPG?v=1509271787","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8274.JPG?v=1509271795","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8275.JPG?v=1509271801"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8270.JPG?v=1509271765","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Yukura Shrine from Hokkaido Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\"Legend says over 500 years ago around 1453, a wood cutter found a steaming marshland when he was resting on a low hill on his way home. Drawing close he put his hand into the water to find it was a hot spring. Later when the wood cutter felt pain in his arm joint, recalling of the spring, he bathed in it to find his arm cured shortly after. In gratitude the wood cutter carved a Yakushinyorai (Bhaisajyaguru) and built a small shrine to enshrine it in. This is how the Yukura Shrine was born and Yunokawa Onsen began.\u003cbr\u003e Above is lore, but from the research done by Matsumae clan in 1717 it is stated that the shrine was approximately 100 years old. The “Yakushinyorai” is supposed to have been enshrined at the springs since 1617. And from certain fact and existing shrine treasures show clear pedigree. When Takahiro, the 9th lord of Matsumae clan, was young and called Chikatsu-maru, he became seriously ill. Doctors and medication and failed to help and his conditions were worse every day. One night his mother Seiryoin saw prophecy in her dream “Seek east of Matsumae, You shall find a mysterious hot spring. There all illness will be cured.” Immediately she sent a servant to find the hot spring and bathed Chikatsu-maru in it. Shortly Chikatsu-maru recovered completely. The coming year 1654, Seiryoin reconstructed the shrine pavilion and enshrined a Yakushinyorai about 16cm long made from Shiriuchi gold dust and a Wanikuchi about 19cm wide. Ever since, the shrine has been worshiped to the locals as their heart and soul. In 1876 it was ranked as a township shrine. In 1941 the current pavilions were built.\u003cbr\u003e Devine virtues rise high along with the city’s development up to this day. \"\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis is from the 20th year of the Heisei Era (2008)\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIt measures about 15 x 9.6 x 5mm.\u003c\/p\u003e\nIt measures about 17.7cm x 10.8cm x 8mm. It is from 2004."}
Japanese Shrine Plaque - Ema - Hokkaido

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Yukura Shrine (E9-20) Hokkaido

$15.00

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side....


More Info
{"id":20015874049,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Hakodate Hachimangu (E9-19) Hokkaido Year of the Monkey","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-hakodate-hachimangu-e9-19","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Hakodate Hachimangu Hokkaido Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eHakodate Hachiman Shrine\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (函館八幡宮, \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eHakodate Hachimangu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e) is a Shinto shrine located in Hakodate, Hokkaido. It is a Hachiman shrine, dedicated to the kami Hachiman. It was established in 1445. Its main festival is held annually on August 15. Kami enshrined here include Hondawake no mikoto (品陀和気命), Sumiyoshi no Okami (住吉大神), and Kotohira no Okami (金刀比羅大神). It was formerly a National Shrine of the Second Rank (国幣中社, \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eKokuhei Chūsha\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e) in the Modern system of ranked Shinto Shrines.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eA \u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eHachiman shrine\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (八幡神社 \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eHachiman Jinja\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e, also \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eHachimangū\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e (八幡宮) is a Shinto shrine dedicated to \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003ekami\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e Hachiman.It is the second most numerous type of Shinto shrine after those dedicated to Inari Ōkami (see Inari shrine).\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOriginally the name was read \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eYawata\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e or \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eYahata\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e, a reading still used in some cases. Many towns and cities incorporating the names \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eHachiman\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e, \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eYawata\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e or \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eYahata\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e grew around these shrines.\u003c\/p\u003e\nIt measures about 17.7cm x 10.8cm x 8mm. It is from 2004.","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-10-29T18:31:43+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Year of the Monkey"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":84712652801,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Hakodate Hachimangu (E9-19) Hokkaido Year of the Monkey","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":80,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8264.JPG?v=1509270146","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8265.JPG?v=1509270159","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8266.JPG?v=1509270168","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8267.JPG?v=1509270176","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8268.JPG?v=1509270185","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8269.JPG?v=1509270193"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8264.JPG?v=1509270146","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Hakodate Hachimangu Hokkaido Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eHakodate Hachiman Shrine\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (函館八幡宮, \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eHakodate Hachimangu\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e) is a Shinto shrine located in Hakodate, Hokkaido. It is a Hachiman shrine, dedicated to the kami Hachiman. It was established in 1445. Its main festival is held annually on August 15. Kami enshrined here include Hondawake no mikoto (品陀和気命), Sumiyoshi no Okami (住吉大神), and Kotohira no Okami (金刀比羅大神). It was formerly a National Shrine of the Second Rank (国幣中社, \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eKokuhei Chūsha\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e) in the Modern system of ranked Shinto Shrines.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eA \u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eHachiman shrine\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (八幡神社 \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eHachiman Jinja\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e, also \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eHachimangū\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e (八幡宮) is a Shinto shrine dedicated to \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003ekami\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e Hachiman.It is the second most numerous type of Shinto shrine after those dedicated to Inari Ōkami (see Inari shrine).\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOriginally the name was read \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eYawata\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e or \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eYahata\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e, a reading still used in some cases. Many towns and cities incorporating the names \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eHachiman\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e, \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eYawata\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e or \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eYahata\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e grew around these shrines.\u003c\/p\u003e\nIt measures about 17.7cm x 10.8cm x 8mm. It is from 2004."}
Japanese Shrine Plaque - Ema - Hokkaido Year of the Monkey

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Hakodate Hachimangu (E9-19) Hokkaido Year of the Monkey

$15.00

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side....


More Info
{"id":19943915521,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Byodo-In (E9-27) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-byodo-in-e9-27-buddhist-temple-in-kyoto","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Byodo-In Temple, Kyoto Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eByōdō-in\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (平等院) is a Buddhist temple in the city of Uji in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan, built in late Heian period. It is jointly a temple of the Jōdo-shū (Pure Land) and Tendai-shū sects.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis temple was originally built in 998 in the Heian period as a rural villa of high-ranking courtier Minamoto no Shigenobu, Minister of the Left. The property was purchased from Minamoto no Shigenobu's wife after he died by Fujiwara no Michinaga, one of the most powerful members of the Fujiwara clan. The villa was made into a Buddhist temple by Fujiwara no Yorimichi in 1052. The most famous building in the temple is the Phoenix Hall (鳳凰堂 \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eHōō-dō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e) or the Amida Hall, constructed in 1053. It is the only remaining original building, surrounded by a scenic pond; additional buildings making up the compound were burnt down during a civil war in 1336.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe main building in Byōdō-in, the Phoenix Hall consists of a central hall, flanked by twin wing corridors on both sides of the central hall, and a tail corridor. The central hall houses an image of Amida Buddha. The roof of the hall displays statues of the Chinese phoenix, called \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003ehōō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e in Japanese.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Phoenix Hall, completed in 1053, is the exemplar of Fujiwara Amida halls. It consists of a main rectangular structure flanked by two L-shaped wing corridors and a tail corridor, set at the edge of a large artificial pond. Though its official name is Amida-dō, it began to be called Hōō-dō, or Phoenix Hall, in the beginning of the Edo period. This name is considered to derive both from the building's likeness to a phoenix with outstretched wings and a tail, and the pair of phoenixes adorning the roof.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eInside the Phoenix Hall, a single image of Amida (c. 1053) is installed on a high platform. The Amida sculpture is made of Japanese cypress and is covered with gold leaf. It was executed by Jōchō, who used a new canon of proportions and a new technique, \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eyosegi\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e, in which multiple pieces of wood are carved out like shells and joined from the inside. The statue measures about three meters high from its face to its knees, and is seated. Applied to the walls of the hall are small relief carvings of celestials, the host believed to have accompanied Amida when he descended from the Western Paradise to gather the souls of believers at the moment of death and transport them in lotus blossoms to Paradise. \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eRaigō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e paintings on the wooden doors of the Phoenix Hall, depicting the Descent of the Amida Buddha, are an early example of Yamato-e, Japanese-style painting, and contain representations of the scenery around Kyoto.\u003c\/p\u003e\nIt measures about 5.5cm x 6.2cm x 1cm.","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-10-29T17:16:15+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Phoenix"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":83889782785,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Byodo-In (E9-27) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":80,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_2802.JPG?v=1509266197","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_2803.JPG?v=1509266205","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_2804.JPG?v=1509266214","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_2805.JPG?v=1509266222","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_2806.JPG?v=1509266229"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_2802.JPG?v=1509266197","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Byodo-In Temple, Kyoto Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eByōdō-in\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (平等院) is a Buddhist temple in the city of Uji in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan, built in late Heian period. It is jointly a temple of the Jōdo-shū (Pure Land) and Tendai-shū sects.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis temple was originally built in 998 in the Heian period as a rural villa of high-ranking courtier Minamoto no Shigenobu, Minister of the Left. The property was purchased from Minamoto no Shigenobu's wife after he died by Fujiwara no Michinaga, one of the most powerful members of the Fujiwara clan. The villa was made into a Buddhist temple by Fujiwara no Yorimichi in 1052. The most famous building in the temple is the Phoenix Hall (鳳凰堂 \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eHōō-dō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e) or the Amida Hall, constructed in 1053. It is the only remaining original building, surrounded by a scenic pond; additional buildings making up the compound were burnt down during a civil war in 1336.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe main building in Byōdō-in, the Phoenix Hall consists of a central hall, flanked by twin wing corridors on both sides of the central hall, and a tail corridor. The central hall houses an image of Amida Buddha. The roof of the hall displays statues of the Chinese phoenix, called \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003ehōō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e in Japanese.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Phoenix Hall, completed in 1053, is the exemplar of Fujiwara Amida halls. It consists of a main rectangular structure flanked by two L-shaped wing corridors and a tail corridor, set at the edge of a large artificial pond. Though its official name is Amida-dō, it began to be called Hōō-dō, or Phoenix Hall, in the beginning of the Edo period. This name is considered to derive both from the building's likeness to a phoenix with outstretched wings and a tail, and the pair of phoenixes adorning the roof.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eInside the Phoenix Hall, a single image of Amida (c. 1053) is installed on a high platform. The Amida sculpture is made of Japanese cypress and is covered with gold leaf. It was executed by Jōchō, who used a new canon of proportions and a new technique, \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eyosegi\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e, in which multiple pieces of wood are carved out like shells and joined from the inside. The statue measures about three meters high from its face to its knees, and is seated. Applied to the walls of the hall are small relief carvings of celestials, the host believed to have accompanied Amida when he descended from the Western Paradise to gather the souls of believers at the moment of death and transport them in lotus blossoms to Paradise. \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eRaigō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e paintings on the wooden doors of the Phoenix Hall, depicting the Descent of the Amida Buddha, are an early example of Yamato-e, Japanese-style painting, and contain representations of the scenery around Kyoto.\u003c\/p\u003e\nIt measures about 5.5cm x 6.2cm x 1cm."}
Kyoto Temple Plaque - Ema - Phoenix

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Byodo-In (E9-27) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto

$15.00

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side....


More Info
{"id":19922288641,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Tenryu-ji Temple (E9-23) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-tenryu-ji-temple-e9-23-buddhist-temple-in-kyoto","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Tenryu-ji Temple, Kyoto Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eTenryū-ji\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (天龍寺)—more formally known as \u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eTenryū Shiseizen-ji\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (天龍資聖禅寺)—is the head temple of the Tenryū branch of Rinzai Zen Buddhism, located in Susukinobaba-chō, Ukyō Ward, Kyoto, Japan. The temple was founded by Ashikaga Takauji in 1339, primarily to venerate Gautama Buddha, and its first chief priest was Musō Soseki. Construction was completed in 1345. As a temple related to both the Ashikaga family and Emperor Go-Daigo, the temple is held in high esteem, and is ranked number one among Kyoto's so-called Five Mountains. In 1994, it was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as part of the \"Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto\".\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOn this Ema it mentions the day before the beginning of spring which is \"setsubun\" which is when people scatter beans to drive away evil spirits. It is also the year of the rooster.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003ci\u003eSetsubun\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e  is the day before the beginning of spring in Japan. The name literally means \"seasonal division\", but usually the term refers to the spring Setsubun, properly called \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eRisshun\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e celebrated yearly on February 3 as part of the Spring Festival ( \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eharu matsuri\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e). In its association with the Lunar New Year, spring Setsubun can be and was previously thought of as a sort of New Year's Eve, and so was accompanied by a special ritual to cleanse away all the evil of the former year and drive away disease-bringing evil spirits for the year to come. This special ritual is called \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003emamemaki\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e ( literally \"bean scattering\"). Setsubun has its origins in \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003etsuina\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e , a Chinese custom introduced to Japan in the eighth century.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is from  the 17th year of the Heisei era (2005)\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 15cm x 8.6cm x 1cm. \u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-10-29T16:53:37+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Year of the Rooster"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":83659718657,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Tenryu-ji Temple (E9-23) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":80,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8288.JPG?v=1509264507","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8289.JPG?v=1509264524","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8290.JPG?v=1509264534","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8291.JPG?v=1509264546","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8292.JPG?v=1509264563"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8288.JPG?v=1509264507","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Tenryu-ji Temple, Kyoto Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eTenryū-ji\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (天龍寺)—more formally known as \u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eTenryū Shiseizen-ji\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (天龍資聖禅寺)—is the head temple of the Tenryū branch of Rinzai Zen Buddhism, located in Susukinobaba-chō, Ukyō Ward, Kyoto, Japan. The temple was founded by Ashikaga Takauji in 1339, primarily to venerate Gautama Buddha, and its first chief priest was Musō Soseki. Construction was completed in 1345. As a temple related to both the Ashikaga family and Emperor Go-Daigo, the temple is held in high esteem, and is ranked number one among Kyoto's so-called Five Mountains. In 1994, it was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as part of the \"Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto\".\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOn this Ema it mentions the day before the beginning of spring which is \"setsubun\" which is when people scatter beans to drive away evil spirits. It is also the year of the rooster.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003ci\u003eSetsubun\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e  is the day before the beginning of spring in Japan. The name literally means \"seasonal division\", but usually the term refers to the spring Setsubun, properly called \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eRisshun\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e celebrated yearly on February 3 as part of the Spring Festival ( \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eharu matsuri\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e). In its association with the Lunar New Year, spring Setsubun can be and was previously thought of as a sort of New Year's Eve, and so was accompanied by a special ritual to cleanse away all the evil of the former year and drive away disease-bringing evil spirits for the year to come. This special ritual is called \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003emamemaki\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e ( literally \"bean scattering\"). Setsubun has its origins in \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003etsuina\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e , a Chinese custom introduced to Japan in the eighth century.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is from  the 17th year of the Heisei era (2005)\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 15cm x 8.6cm x 1cm. \u003c\/p\u003e"}
Year of the Rooster Kyoto Temple Plaque

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Tenryu-ji Temple (E9-23) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto

$15.00

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side....


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{"id":19889258497,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Gangyo-ji Temple (E9-24) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-chionin-temple-e9-25-buddhist-temple-in-kyoto-1","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Gangyo-ji Temple, Kyoto Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eGangyō-ji was founded in the early Heian period.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e877 : The temple is founded, and it takes its name from the era (nengō) in which it was first established.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e986 : The emperor Kazan abdicated in this temple. He renounced his throne and the world. Two courtiers, the chūnagon Yoshikane and the sachūben (左中辨 middle-level controller of the left) Korenari, decided to follow the former emperor’s example and became Buddhist priests themselves. After this, the temple was also known more popularly as Kazan-ji (花山寺 Temple of (Emperor) Kazan).\u003c\/p\u003e\n \u003cbr\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is from  the 19th year of the Heisei era (2007)\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 13.8cm x 9cm x 5mm. \u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-10-29T16:19:05+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Image Of A Temple"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":83344687105,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Gangyo-ji Temple (E9-24) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":80,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8293.JPG?v=1509262480","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8294.JPG?v=1509262489","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8295.JPG?v=1509262496","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8296.JPG?v=1509262505","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8297.JPG?v=1509262514"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8293.JPG?v=1509262480","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Gangyo-ji Temple, Kyoto Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eGangyō-ji was founded in the early Heian period.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e877 : The temple is founded, and it takes its name from the era (nengō) in which it was first established.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e986 : The emperor Kazan abdicated in this temple. He renounced his throne and the world. Two courtiers, the chūnagon Yoshikane and the sachūben (左中辨 middle-level controller of the left) Korenari, decided to follow the former emperor’s example and became Buddhist priests themselves. After this, the temple was also known more popularly as Kazan-ji (花山寺 Temple of (Emperor) Kazan).\u003c\/p\u003e\n \u003cbr\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is from  the 19th year of the Heisei era (2007)\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 13.8cm x 9cm x 5mm. \u003c\/p\u003e"}
Kyoto Temple Plaque - Ema

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Gangyo-ji Temple (E9-24) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto

$15.00

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side....


More Info
{"id":10270352321,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Year of the Pig Kitano Shrine (E7-6)","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-year-of-the-pig-kitano-shrine-e7-6","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Kitano Tenmangū (北野天満宮) - a Shinto shrine in Kamigyō-ku, Kyoto, Japan.\u003c\/span\u003e \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThe shrine was first built in 947 to appease the angry spirit of bureaucrat, scholar and poet Sugawara no Michizane, who had been exiled as a result of political maneuvers of his enemies in the Fujiwara clan.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThe shrine became the object of Imperial patronage during the early Heian period. In 965, Emperor Murakami ordered that Imperial messengers be sent to report important events to the guardian kami of Japan. These messenger, called heihaku, were initially presented to 16 shrines; and in 991, Emperor Ichijō added three more shrines to Murakami's list — including Kitano.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eFrom 1871 through 1946, the Kitano Tenman-gū was officially designated one of the Kanpei-chūsha (官幣中社), meaning that it stood in the second rank of government supported shrines.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis is from the 19th  year of the Heisei Era (2007). It is the year of the pig.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 16 x 10 x 1 cm.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-10-07T13:46:14+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Year Of The Pig"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":38396406465,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Year of the Pig Kitano Shrine (E7-6)","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":80,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/x_4cc43536-493f-42ac-9d19-dd7fa1703ef7.jpg?v=1507351781","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/xx_46d89c0d-e92b-4d46-9789-d6574f7253f7.jpg?v=1507351786","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/xxx_7e000ad0-1a9e-4454-ba03-414573dee600.jpg?v=1507351792","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/xxxx_4cb7a952-e8b6-44da-bf40-5b611da91463.jpg?v=1507351800"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/x_4cc43536-493f-42ac-9d19-dd7fa1703ef7.jpg?v=1507351781","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Kitano Tenmangū (北野天満宮) - a Shinto shrine in Kamigyō-ku, Kyoto, Japan.\u003c\/span\u003e \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThe shrine was first built in 947 to appease the angry spirit of bureaucrat, scholar and poet Sugawara no Michizane, who had been exiled as a result of political maneuvers of his enemies in the Fujiwara clan.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThe shrine became the object of Imperial patronage during the early Heian period. In 965, Emperor Murakami ordered that Imperial messengers be sent to report important events to the guardian kami of Japan. These messenger, called heihaku, were initially presented to 16 shrines; and in 991, Emperor Ichijō added three more shrines to Murakami's list — including Kitano.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eFrom 1871 through 1946, the Kitano Tenman-gū was officially designated one of the Kanpei-chūsha (官幣中社), meaning that it stood in the second rank of government supported shrines.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis is from the 19th  year of the Heisei Era (2007). It is the year of the pig.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 16 x 10 x 1 cm.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}
Year of the Pig - Japanese Temple Plaque Ema

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Year of the Pig Kitano Shrine (E7-6)

$15.00

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side....


More Info
{"id":10206466241,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Imakumano Kannouji Temple in Kyoto (E9-21)","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-imakumano-kannouji-temple-in-kyoto-e9-21","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Imakumano Kannonji Temple, Kyoto Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eKumano Gongen was a popular deity in the late Heian era – Emperor Go Shirakawa was a fervent follower of the Kumano Gongen and for nearly twenty years after his abdication he went annually to Kumano. Prior to Emperor Go Shirakawa, this temple was known simply as Kannon-ji but he renamed it Shin Nachizan Kannon-ji and named the surrounding area Ima Kumano. He also established the Kumano Gongen shrine at Kannonji. It is probably at this time that the Kobo Daishi story came to involve the old man as Kumano Gongen. It was convenient to have this temple\/shrine complex in Kyoto city so that people wouldn’t have to travel all the way precariously to the real Kumano! For example, during the Gempei wars (1180-1185) it was not possible to travel and Emperor Go Shirakawa traveled to the shrine at Kannonji instead.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis area was decimated in the Onin Wars of the late 16th Century and afterwards priests traveled the countryside soliciting funds to rebuild it.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMany Emperors are buried here including Emperor Komei who was Emperor Meiji’s successor.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAlso having close connections with Kumano and Seigantoji (Temple #1), Imakumano (Present-day Kumano) Kannonji provides a tranquil oasis in the midst of the city of Kyoto. Stepping into the leafy grounds here, after crossing the red lacquer bridge, you immediately feel as if you could indeed be far away in the primeval forests of Kumano instead of the middle of a city. Sipping the waters of the ancient spring at the Five Wisdoms Well is said to improve your mental acuity, and the temple has documented many miracles for over a thousand years of curing headaches.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis temple is #15 in the Saigoku Kannon Pilgrimage.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe \u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eSaigoku Kannon Pilgrimage\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (西国三十三所 \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eSaigoku Sanjūsan-sho\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e) is a pilgrimage of thirty-three Buddhist temples throughout the Kansai region of Japan, similar to the Shikoku Pilgrimage. In addition to the official thirty-three temples, there are an additional three known as \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003ebangai\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e (番外). The principal image in each temple is Kannon, known to Westerners as the Bodhisattva of Compassion (or sometimes mistranslated as 'Goddess of Mercy') ; however, there is some variation among the images and the powers they possess.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIt is traditional for pilgrims to wear white clothing and conical straw hats and to carry walking sticks. While the route was historically traveled by foot, today pilgrims usually use cars or trains. Pilgrims record their progress with a prayer book (納経帖 \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eNōkyō-chō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e), which the temple staff mark with red stamps and Japanese calligraphy indicating the temple number, the temple name, and the specific name of the Kannon image. Some pilgrims receive the stamps and calligraphy on wall scrolls (for a decorative hanging) and on their white coats (to be cremated in) as well.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is from  the 17th year of the Heisei era (2005)\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 13.5cm x 8.6cm x 7mm. \u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-09-24T17:08:43+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Image Of A Temple"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":38069499521,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Imakumano Kannouji Temple in Kyoto (E9-21)","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":80,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8277.JPG?v=1506242955","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8276.JPG?v=1506242964","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8278.JPG?v=1506242971","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8279.JPG?v=1506242977","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8280.JPG?v=1506242983","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8281.JPG?v=1506242990"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8277.JPG?v=1506242955","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Imakumano Kannonji Temple, Kyoto Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eKumano Gongen was a popular deity in the late Heian era – Emperor Go Shirakawa was a fervent follower of the Kumano Gongen and for nearly twenty years after his abdication he went annually to Kumano. Prior to Emperor Go Shirakawa, this temple was known simply as Kannon-ji but he renamed it Shin Nachizan Kannon-ji and named the surrounding area Ima Kumano. He also established the Kumano Gongen shrine at Kannonji. It is probably at this time that the Kobo Daishi story came to involve the old man as Kumano Gongen. It was convenient to have this temple\/shrine complex in Kyoto city so that people wouldn’t have to travel all the way precariously to the real Kumano! For example, during the Gempei wars (1180-1185) it was not possible to travel and Emperor Go Shirakawa traveled to the shrine at Kannonji instead.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis area was decimated in the Onin Wars of the late 16th Century and afterwards priests traveled the countryside soliciting funds to rebuild it.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMany Emperors are buried here including Emperor Komei who was Emperor Meiji’s successor.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAlso having close connections with Kumano and Seigantoji (Temple #1), Imakumano (Present-day Kumano) Kannonji provides a tranquil oasis in the midst of the city of Kyoto. Stepping into the leafy grounds here, after crossing the red lacquer bridge, you immediately feel as if you could indeed be far away in the primeval forests of Kumano instead of the middle of a city. Sipping the waters of the ancient spring at the Five Wisdoms Well is said to improve your mental acuity, and the temple has documented many miracles for over a thousand years of curing headaches.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis temple is #15 in the Saigoku Kannon Pilgrimage.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe \u003cstrong\u003e\u003cb\u003eSaigoku Kannon Pilgrimage\u003c\/b\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e (西国三十三所 \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eSaigoku Sanjūsan-sho\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e) is a pilgrimage of thirty-three Buddhist temples throughout the Kansai region of Japan, similar to the Shikoku Pilgrimage. In addition to the official thirty-three temples, there are an additional three known as \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003ebangai\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e (番外). The principal image in each temple is Kannon, known to Westerners as the Bodhisattva of Compassion (or sometimes mistranslated as 'Goddess of Mercy') ; however, there is some variation among the images and the powers they possess.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIt is traditional for pilgrims to wear white clothing and conical straw hats and to carry walking sticks. While the route was historically traveled by foot, today pilgrims usually use cars or trains. Pilgrims record their progress with a prayer book (納経帖 \u003cem\u003e\u003ci\u003eNōkyō-chō\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e), which the temple staff mark with red stamps and Japanese calligraphy indicating the temple number, the temple name, and the specific name of the Kannon image. Some pilgrims receive the stamps and calligraphy on wall scrolls (for a decorative hanging) and on their white coats (to be cremated in) as well.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is from  the 17th year of the Heisei era (2005)\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 13.5cm x 8.6cm x 7mm. \u003c\/p\u003e"}
Kyoto Temple Plaque - Ema

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Imakumano Kannouji Temple in Kyoto (E9-21)

$15.00

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side....


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{"id":10170800769,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Chionin Temple (E9-25) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-chionin-temple-e9-25-buddhist-temple-in-kyoto","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Chionin Temple, Kyoto Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eChionin (知恩院) is the head temple of the Jodo sect of Japanese Buddhism, which has millions of followers and is one the the most popular Buddhist sects in Japan. The temple has spacious grounds and large buildings. Visitors will surely notice the temple when they come across its massive Sanmon Gate.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Sanmon Gate, Chionin's main entrance gate, is located alongside the road between Maruyama Park and Shorenin Temple. Standing 24 meters tall and 50 meters wide, it is the largest wooden gate in Japan and dates back to the early 1600s. The gate's balcony is not open to the public. Behind the gate a wide set of stairs leads to the main temple grounds.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is from  the 19th year of the Heisei era (2007)\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 15cm x 10cm x 7mm. \u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-09-16T17:10:08+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Image Of A Temple"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":37899105089,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Chionin Temple (E9-25) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":80,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8299.JPG?v=1505550006","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8298.JPG?v=1505550014","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8300.JPG?v=1505550022","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8301.JPG?v=1505550030","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8302.JPG?v=1505550049"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/IMG_8299.JPG?v=1505550006","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********This Ema is from Chionin Temple, Kyoto Prefecture\u003c\/span\u003e.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eChionin (知恩院) is the head temple of the Jodo sect of Japanese Buddhism, which has millions of followers and is one the the most popular Buddhist sects in Japan. The temple has spacious grounds and large buildings. Visitors will surely notice the temple when they come across its massive Sanmon Gate.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Sanmon Gate, Chionin's main entrance gate, is located alongside the road between Maruyama Park and Shorenin Temple. Standing 24 meters tall and 50 meters wide, it is the largest wooden gate in Japan and dates back to the early 1600s. The gate's balcony is not open to the public. Behind the gate a wide set of stairs leads to the main temple grounds.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is from  the 19th year of the Heisei era (2007)\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 15cm x 10cm x 7mm. \u003c\/p\u003e"}
Japanese Wooden Temple Plaque - Kyoto Japan

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Chionin Temple (E9-25) Buddhist Temple in Kyoto

$15.00

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side....


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{"id":10035403777,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Year of Snake Sumiyoshi Shrine (E5-31)","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-year-of-snake-sumiyoshi-shrine-e5-31","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********\u003c\/span\u003eThis Ema is from Sumiyoshi Shrine located in Sumiyoshi ward in Osaka, Japan. \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eSumiyoshi taisha (住吉大社), also known as Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine, is a Shinto shrine in Sumiyoshi ward in the city of Osaka, Japan. It is the main shrine of all the Sumiyoshi shrines in Japan. However, the oldest shrine that enshrines the Sumiyoshi sanjin, the three Sumiyoshi kami, is the Sumiyoshi shrine in Hakata.\u003cbr\u003eIt is called \"Sumiyoshi-san\" or \"Sumiyossan\" by the locals, and is famous for the large crowds that come to the shrine on New Year's Day for hatsumōde.\u003cbr\u003eSumiyoshi taisha enshrines the Sumiyoshi tanjin—Sokotsutsu no Onomikoto, Nakatsutsu no Onomikoto, and Uwatsutsu no Onomikoto—and Okinagatarashihime no Mikoto (Empress Jingū), and they are collectively known as the \"Sumiyoshi Ōkami\", the great gods of Sumiyoshi. Another term is \"Sumiyoshi no Ōgami no Miya\".\u003cbr\u003eIt gives its name to a style of shrine architecture known as Sumiyoshi-zukuri.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is for the year of the snake in the 13th year of the Heisei  Era (2001).\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 8.6 x 6.5 x 7 mm.  \u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003eThis is smaller than some of our other Ema so please check the measurements carefully.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-family: Georgia; font-size: x-large;\" size=\"5\" face=\"Georgia\"\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-08-17T19:29:00+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Year Of The Snake"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":37212042881,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Year of Snake Sumiyoshi Shrine (E5-31)","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":35,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_236.JPG?v=1502966176","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_237.JPG?v=1502966184","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_238.JPG?v=1502966192","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_239.JPG?v=1502966199","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_240.JPG?v=1502966206","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_241.JPG?v=1502966224"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_236.JPG?v=1502966176","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********\u003c\/span\u003eThis Ema is from Sumiyoshi Shrine located in Sumiyoshi ward in Osaka, Japan. \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eSumiyoshi taisha (住吉大社), also known as Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine, is a Shinto shrine in Sumiyoshi ward in the city of Osaka, Japan. It is the main shrine of all the Sumiyoshi shrines in Japan. However, the oldest shrine that enshrines the Sumiyoshi sanjin, the three Sumiyoshi kami, is the Sumiyoshi shrine in Hakata.\u003cbr\u003eIt is called \"Sumiyoshi-san\" or \"Sumiyossan\" by the locals, and is famous for the large crowds that come to the shrine on New Year's Day for hatsumōde.\u003cbr\u003eSumiyoshi taisha enshrines the Sumiyoshi tanjin—Sokotsutsu no Onomikoto, Nakatsutsu no Onomikoto, and Uwatsutsu no Onomikoto—and Okinagatarashihime no Mikoto (Empress Jingū), and they are collectively known as the \"Sumiyoshi Ōkami\", the great gods of Sumiyoshi. Another term is \"Sumiyoshi no Ōgami no Miya\".\u003cbr\u003eIt gives its name to a style of shrine architecture known as Sumiyoshi-zukuri.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is for the year of the snake in the 13th year of the Heisei  Era (2001).\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 8.6 x 6.5 x 7 mm.  \u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003eThis is smaller than some of our other Ema so please check the measurements carefully.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-family: Georgia; font-size: x-large;\" size=\"5\" face=\"Georgia\"\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}
Japanese Year of the snake Temple Plaque Ema

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Year of Snake Sumiyoshi Shrine (E5-31)

$15.00

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side....


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{"id":10035363201,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Year of Sheep Sumiyoshi Shrine (E5-34)","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-year-of-sheep-sumiyoshi-shrine-e5-34","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********\u003c\/span\u003eThis Ema is from Sumiyoshi Shrine located in Sumiyoshi ward in Osaka, Japan. \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eSumiyoshi taisha (住吉大社), also known as Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine, is a Shinto shrine in Sumiyoshi ward in the city of Osaka, Japan. It is the main shrine of all the Sumiyoshi shrines in Japan. However, the oldest shrine that enshrines the Sumiyoshi sanjin, the three Sumiyoshi kami, is the Sumiyoshi shrine in Hakata.\u003cbr\u003eIt is called \"Sumiyoshi-san\" or \"Sumiyossan\" by the locals, and is famous for the large crowds that come to the shrine on New Year's Day for hatsumōde.\u003cbr\u003eSumiyoshi taisha enshrines the Sumiyoshi tanjin—Sokotsutsu no Onomikoto, Nakatsutsu no Onomikoto, and Uwatsutsu no Onomikoto—and Okinagatarashihime no Mikoto (Empress Jingū), and they are collectively known as the \"Sumiyoshi Ōkami\", the great gods of Sumiyoshi. Another term is \"Sumiyoshi no Ōgami no Miya\".\u003cbr\u003eIt gives its name to a style of shrine architecture known as Sumiyoshi-zukuri.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is for the year of the sheep in the 15th year of the Heisei  Era (2003).\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 8.6 x 6.5 x 7 mm.  \u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003eThis is smaller than some of our other Ema so please check the measurements carefully.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-08-17T19:18:10+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Year of the Sheep"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":37211669569,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Year of Sheep Sumiyoshi Shrine (E5-34)","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":35,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_252.JPG?v=1502965605","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_250.JPG?v=1502965614","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_251.JPG?v=1502965620","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_253.JPG?v=1502965626","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_254.JPG?v=1502965632","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_255.JPG?v=1502965639"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_252.JPG?v=1502965605","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********\u003c\/span\u003eThis Ema is from Sumiyoshi Shrine located in Sumiyoshi ward in Osaka, Japan. \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eSumiyoshi taisha (住吉大社), also known as Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine, is a Shinto shrine in Sumiyoshi ward in the city of Osaka, Japan. It is the main shrine of all the Sumiyoshi shrines in Japan. However, the oldest shrine that enshrines the Sumiyoshi sanjin, the three Sumiyoshi kami, is the Sumiyoshi shrine in Hakata.\u003cbr\u003eIt is called \"Sumiyoshi-san\" or \"Sumiyossan\" by the locals, and is famous for the large crowds that come to the shrine on New Year's Day for hatsumōde.\u003cbr\u003eSumiyoshi taisha enshrines the Sumiyoshi tanjin—Sokotsutsu no Onomikoto, Nakatsutsu no Onomikoto, and Uwatsutsu no Onomikoto—and Okinagatarashihime no Mikoto (Empress Jingū), and they are collectively known as the \"Sumiyoshi Ōkami\", the great gods of Sumiyoshi. Another term is \"Sumiyoshi no Ōgami no Miya\".\u003cbr\u003eIt gives its name to a style of shrine architecture known as Sumiyoshi-zukuri.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is for the year of the sheep in the 15th year of the Heisei  Era (2003).\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 8.6 x 6.5 x 7 mm.  \u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003eThis is smaller than some of our other Ema so please check the measurements carefully.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}
Year of the sheep - Japanese Temple Plaque Ema

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Year of Sheep Sumiyoshi Shrine (E5-34)

$15.00

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side....


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{"id":10035313153,"title":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Year of Dragon Sumiyoshi Shrine (E5-35)","handle":"ema-japanese-wood-plaque-year-of-dragon-sumiyoshi-shrine-e5-35","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********\u003c\/span\u003eThis Ema is from Sumiyoshi Shrine located in Sumiyoshi ward in Osaka, Japan. \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eSumiyoshi taisha (住吉大社), also known as Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine, is a Shinto shrine in Sumiyoshi ward in the city of Osaka, Japan. It is the main shrine of all the Sumiyoshi shrines in Japan. However, the oldest shrine that enshrines the Sumiyoshi sanjin, the three Sumiyoshi kami, is the Sumiyoshi shrine in Hakata.\u003cbr\u003eIt is called \"Sumiyoshi-san\" or \"Sumiyossan\" by the locals, and is famous for the large crowds that come to the shrine on New Year's Day for hatsumōde.\u003cbr\u003eSumiyoshi taisha enshrines the Sumiyoshi tanjin—Sokotsutsu no Onomikoto, Nakatsutsu no Onomikoto, and Uwatsutsu no Onomikoto—and Okinagatarashihime no Mikoto (Empress Jingū), and they are collectively known as the \"Sumiyoshi Ōkami\", the great gods of Sumiyoshi. Another term is \"Sumiyoshi no Ōgami no Miya\".\u003cbr\u003eIt gives its name to a style of shrine architecture known as Sumiyoshi-zukuri.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is for the year of the dragon in the 12th year of the Heisei  Era (2000).\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 8.6 x 6.5 x 7 mm.  \u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003eThis is smaller than some of our other Ema so please check the measurements carefully.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2017-06-12T01:34:57+09:00","created_at":"2017-08-17T19:05:55+09:00","vendor":"FromJapanWithLove","type":"Shrine Plaques","tags":["Pattern_Year of the Dragon"],"price":1500,"price_min":1500,"price_max":1500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":37211267265,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Year of Dragon Sumiyoshi Shrine (E5-35)","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1500,"weight":35,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_247.JPG?v=1502964879","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_243.JPG?v=1502964890","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_244.JPG?v=1502964897","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_245.JPG?v=1502964903","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_246.JPG?v=1502964910","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_249.JPG?v=1502964917"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1633\/0069\/products\/august_17th_247.JPG?v=1502964879","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an \"Ema\". \"Ema\" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning \"wish\", written along the side. In ancient times people would donate horses to the shrines for good favor, over time this was transferred to a wooden plaque with a picture of a horse, and later still to the various wooden plaques sold today for the same purpose.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eEma are sold for various wishes. Common reasons for buying a plaque are for success in work or on exams, marital bliss, to have children, and health. Some shrines specialize in certain types of these plaques, and the larger shrines may offer more than one. Sales of ema help support the shrine financially.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003e********\u003c\/span\u003eThis Ema is from Sumiyoshi Shrine located in Sumiyoshi ward in Osaka, Japan. \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eSumiyoshi taisha (住吉大社), also known as Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine, is a Shinto shrine in Sumiyoshi ward in the city of Osaka, Japan. It is the main shrine of all the Sumiyoshi shrines in Japan. However, the oldest shrine that enshrines the Sumiyoshi sanjin, the three Sumiyoshi kami, is the Sumiyoshi shrine in Hakata.\u003cbr\u003eIt is called \"Sumiyoshi-san\" or \"Sumiyossan\" by the locals, and is famous for the large crowds that come to the shrine on New Year's Day for hatsumōde.\u003cbr\u003eSumiyoshi taisha enshrines the Sumiyoshi tanjin—Sokotsutsu no Onomikoto, Nakatsutsu no Onomikoto, and Uwatsutsu no Onomikoto—and Okinagatarashihime no Mikoto (Empress Jingū), and they are collectively known as the \"Sumiyoshi Ōkami\", the great gods of Sumiyoshi. Another term is \"Sumiyoshi no Ōgami no Miya\".\u003cbr\u003eIt gives its name to a style of shrine architecture known as Sumiyoshi-zukuri.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThis Ema is for the year of the dragon in the 12th year of the Heisei  Era (2000).\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eIt measures about 8.6 x 6.5 x 7 mm.  \u003cspan style=\"color: #ff0000;\"\u003eThis is smaller than some of our other Ema so please check the measurements carefully.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}
Year of the Dragon Japanese Temple Plaque Ema

Ema - Japanese Wood Plaque Year of Dragon Sumiyoshi Shrine (E5-35)

$15.00

This is an "Ema". "Ema" are small wooden plaques on which Shinto worshippers write their prayers or wishes. The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them. They bear various pictures, often of animals or other Shinto imagery, and many have the word gan'i (願意), meaning "wish", written along the side....


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